How To Find a Bank Branch Number

Knowing your bank branch number may be necessary in some cases. It is a quick way to identify which bank someone is referring to and can save a lot of time.

But perhaps you are unsure how to find a bank branch number.  As you will soon see, finding your bank branch number isn’t always simple, and there are a few places it might be when located on a check.

You can also use another method to get the number that will help you know for sure that you’ve found the right thing. Here’s how to find a bank branch number when you need to. 

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What Is a Branch Number of a Bank?

First of all, what is the branch number for a bank? What does it do?

The branch number identifies your financial institution’s branch. It’s a way to know which bank branch you are referring to.

How Do I Know My Bank Branch Number?

This is information you may need at some point. So where can you find out your bank branch number?

The first thing would be to ask the teller at your bank branch. Next time you stop by your bank, take a moment to ask the teller.

Then you can write it down, so you have access to it later, or memorizing it might be even better.

Another way to find out your bank branch number is to look at one of your checks. Your bank branch number, also known as a fractional bank number, can be located in several places on a check.

It could be beneath the check number, beneath the ABA number, or to its right, or to the above/right of the date on the check. With all this confusion, it’s best to simply ask your bank if you’re not sure.

How Do I Find My Branch Number Without a Check?

It might be pretty easy to find what you need if you have some checks on hand. But what if you don’t carry checks or are out of them?

How do you find the bank branch number then? The best way is to contact your bank.

Ask them directly what the number is, instead of looking in a bunch of other places. They will have the information on hand, and this is the fastest way to find what you need if you don’t have a check.

You can also look on your bank’s website. They’ll sometimes have a link to this information in the website’s footer.

How To Find the Branch Number of a Bank

If you are still at a loss for how to find the branch number, here’s a recap. First, you can look at one of your checks.

The number may be located near your check number or ABA number. Look there to get the information you need. 

Perhaps you can’t find your bank branch number on the check or feel unsure that you have the correct information. Contact your bank and speak to a bank teller if you’re still lost.

They are sure to have all the accurate information, and it is an easy way to get what you need. If you are in doubt about the number on your check, double-check by asking your bank about the branch number. 

When You Might Need a Bank Branch Number

If you need to give the specific location for your bank, you need to know your bank branch number. Although the chances of you using this number in your everyday life are rare, it is still wise to know how to find the information if it’s ever needed.

It can come in handy for location purposes, so it’s essential that you can find this number when necessary.

Reading Checks

If you’re new to this, a check can look like just a mess of numbers without a lot of logic. But every number stands for something. It’s essential to know how to find all necessary information when reading a check. Here are the basics.

First, the information for whoever wrote the check will be on the top left corner, be it a company or a person. It will include the person or company’s name and address. 

On the top right is a 4 digit check number. This identifies the specific check so that you know which one it is. You may sometimes see the bank branch number beneath it. 

In the middle of your check on the left are the words: “Pay To The Order Of,” followed by a blank space. This indicates who the money is for. If someone writes you a check, your name will go there. If you write one to someone else, their name should be printed there. Directly beneath it, you can print the amount the check is for.

In the middle, on the right, is a space for you to write the dollar amount in numbers that the check is for. Since you write the amount in print and number form, it keeps any confusion from happening.

Last, you’ll see a blank space for a memo on the bottom left. You can write what the check is for, like “utilities” or “phone.” To the right of this is a blank space to sign your name. This makes everything official.

The numbers on the bottom of the check are, from left to right, the routing number, the account number, and the check number again. The bank branch number may, in some cases, be located near the routing number.

You can easily find your bank branch number by looking at a check or contacting that specific bank branch.

When in doubt, if you are unable to find your bank branch number on your check or are unsure about it, you can always contact your bank. It’s a simple way to know for sure that you have the correct information.

Reading a check gives you the opportunity to know more about handling your money. When you can find the bank branch number and properly read a check, you are doing what you can to understand your finances and to make the most of your money.

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Steffa Mantilla

Certified Financial Education Instructor

Steffa is a Certified Financial Education Instructor (CFEI) and the founder behind Money Tamer. Her 12-year background in operant conditioning and positive behavioral change training is used to help people find effective motivators to change their harmful money behaviors. Steffa explains the reasons “why” behind people’s financial behaviors and how to successfully change them. After paying off over $80,000 in debt through budgeting, she now teaches families how to get their own finances in order. You can learn more about her here.

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