29 Best Jobs for Introverts That Pay Well

Some jobs are suited to certain types of people, others not so much. For one, an introvert is likely to struggle in a job that requires working directly with many people.

Work conditions that require introverts to forcefully become outgoing are completely unnatural and very uncomfortable for them. While extroverts tend to find social situations stimulating, introverts find them draining.

Keep in mind that that shyness is not the same as introversion. Shy people can overcome their shyness, but introverts can only accept their introversion, not overcome it since it’s how they recharge their energy. 

If you are reading this, you are likely an introverted person concerned about the types of jobs and career path you could be the best fit for. Then, I’ll go over the benefits of having an introverted personality in the workplace.

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The Best Jobs For Introverts

Below is a list of the best jobs for introverts or people who may be anxious. They typically offer routine, work around the same group of people daily or small groups, and aren’t entirely customer-facing.

1. Veterinary Technician

Vet techs are responsible for providing care to animals. Under the supervision of veterinarians, they assist in the diagnosis and treatment of sick animals.

Veterinary technicians can administer tests like urine and blood analysis, administer anesthesia and medication, and prepare an animal for surgery. 

This role is great for an introvert personality type since the vet tech can administer tests or medications without engaging in small talks with the sick animal. You will have to interact briefly with the animal’s owner though.

Generally, vet techs are required to have an associate’s degree and a license from the state’s board. According to statistics, vet techs can earn an average yearly salary of $35,400, and they have a job growth outlook of 19% over ten years.

2. Auditor

The role of an auditor is to review financial statements and records. They are also responsible for creating tax statements for clients.

Typically, being an auditor is one of the low-stress roles for introverts.  However, this can change when it is tax season. On average, an auditor can look to earn a yearly salary of $56,400.

3. Accounting Manager

The major responsibility of an accounting manager is to manage the day-to-day operations of an organization’s accounting department. This can include creating financial reports and developing accounting policies. 

This role requires focused attention on numbers and minimal chitchat, making it a great fit for introverts. On average, an accounting manager can expect to earn an average of $71,400 yearly.

4. Actuary

The role of an actuary is to analyze risk for financial institutions and insurance agencies using specialized software programs. An actuary can determine the probability of a range of outcomes for potential investments and clients.

Like an auditor and accounting manager, an actuary role requires high concentration and less distraction, which suits an introvert. 

Generally, an actuary is required to have a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, actuarial science, or any related field.  These professionals can earn an average yearly salary of $108,350, with demand for the role seeing a 20% growth in 10 years.

5. Film/Video Editor

Video and film editors utilize video editing software to create a final polished product. Editors only need to interact with a small number of film crew members.

But since the bulk of their work takes place on a computer, they can get the job done alone or with the help of a small group of co-workers. 

Video and film editors earn an average yearly salary of $59,810, with projected job growth of 11% in the next ten years.

If you like video, you could also start your own YouTube channel and edit your own videos. The video recording can be done by yourself and doesn’t require more than you and a camera.

6. Artist

Art is one of those creative roles with no boundaries and lots of variety. Generally, being an artist means you have to create aesthetically pleasing art pieces to sell.

Introverts can become artists because the role requires getting in touch with your inner creativity. On average, a craft artist can earn a yearly salary of $32,000.

7. Court Reporter

The role of a court reporter is to generate word-for-word transcriptions of legal proceedings. A court reporter also reads back or plays back a part of the court proceedings if requested by a judge.

This job is quite different from the others on this list as it requires being around people in a courtroom. However, court reporters rarely interact with those in the court. Instead, they are great listeners. 

Being a court reporter can require a court reporting certificate from a technical or community college. Court reporters can expect to receive an average yearly salary of $60,130.

8. Paralegal

The role of paralegal requires you to provide legal assistance to clients. This can be done by conducting interviews, researching legal cases, or filing documents. It is a good fit for introverts since you’ll only be working with a few clients at a time. On average, a paralegal can earn an annual salary of $48,179.

9. Librarian

A librarian helps library visitors locate books they are interested in and recommend materials to those searching for specific information. What better place for an introvert to work than where everyone is required to be quiet! A librarian can earn an average annual salary of $50,170.

10. Therapist

To be a therapist, one has to have a high degree of empathy and the ability to listen. These skills are innate to restrained introverts, making the job of a therapist best suited to them. Therapists can earn an average yearly salary of $44,530.

11. Social Media Manager

While there might be “social” in the title, being a social media manager is actually a great role for an introvert and usually takes the shape of online jobs.

What a social media manager does is to maintain an organization’s brand from a computer. A social media manager’s job is to create online content, answer online questions, and respond to comments online.

While a social media manager has to work with colleagues and employers, they don’t have to directly engage with clients.  On average, social media managers earn a yearly salary of $50,960.

12. Archivist

An archivist appraises, catalogs, and preserves permanent records and valuable works. An archivist might work in a museum, a library, or within a company’s archives.

To be an archivist, you need a master’s degree in library science, history, archival science, or any related field.

Given that archivists tend to spend a lot of time with archives, either physically or virtually, via the computer, they don’t have to worry about interacting with many people. Archivists earn an average yearly salary of $49,900, with an expected demand of about 9% over ten years.

13. Research Scientist

Research scientists are responsible for performing a range of experiments and tests to discover new conclusions. A career as a research scientist is an excellent role for introverts since it requires spending a lot of time alone musing over facts. On average, research scientists can earn an annual salary of $79,500.

14. Social Media Marketer

It is the responsibility of a social media marketer to plan and execute social media marketing strategies. They are also responsible for analyzing every one of their campaign’s performance.

This is a great role for introverts because it gives them ample time alone on their computers. As a result, a social media or digital marketer can earn an average yearly salary of $51,600.

15. Literary Editor

A literary editor’s main responsibility is to review spelling, grammar, as well as style errors before publishing a text. This role suits introverts as it doesn’t involve interacting with too many people. Editors can earn an average yearly salary of $46,690.

16. Graphic Designer

Graphic designers are responsible for creating visuals used by brands and companies. Just as with any other creative job, they work with a plethora of tools and have limited social interaction with other people. This makes it a perfect role for an introvert. 

Graphic designers do not need any formal education, but a degree or certification in graphic design improves one’s chances. On average, graphic designers can earn a yearly salary of $45,000.

17. Medical Records/Health Information Technician

Health information or medical records technicians organize and maintain medical and health-related data. They work with computers, papers, or a mix of both to retrieve information for healthcare professionals.

They might work in a physician’s office, a hospital, an administrative office, or a nursing facility. Medical records technicians have fewer chances of interacting with patients.

However, they may have to work with other healthcare professionals. Since the bulk of their work is done in front of a computer, the role is perfect for those who don’t want to be the center of attention.

Medical records and health information technicians earn an average yearly salary of $40,400 and have a job growth outlook of about 11% over ten years.

18. Landscape Designer

A landscape designer relies on their creativity and experience to masterfully create plans that will improve the aesthetics of spaces like walkways, water fountains, and ponds.

Creativity is a strong suit for many introverts. On average, a landscape designer can earn an annual income of $49,250.

19. Technical Writer/Writer

Technical writers develop user-friendly manuals and guides to make programs and processes understandable to a layman. For introverts that prefer other forms of writing, there are various writing jobs and freelance writing opportunities available. 

It could be anything from copywriting, which involves creating copies or ads for products and brands, to content writing, which requires a flair for writing informative articles, and creative writing, which involves creating stories. On average, a writer, even in remote jobs, can earn a yearly salary of $60,200.

20. Accountant

Accountants help companies and individuals ensure their financial statements are not only accurate but in compliance with the necessary regulations. Working with numbers is a fantastic role for introverts as they can naturally maintain focus. 

To be an accountant, most employers require a bachelor’s degree in accounting or any related field. Some employers prefer a CPA (Certified Public Accountant) credential.

Accountants earn an average yearly salary of $71,550, with growth in the demand for accountants rising by 6% in ten years.

21. Filmmaker

The role of a filmmaker tends to vary when it comes to creating a film. It is a role that requires a lot of creativity.

A filmmaker is responsible for the overall vision of a project and is required to take charge of the production. While filmmakers usually work with many people, the role suits introverts because it taps into their creative side. On average, filmmakers can earn a yearly salary of $48,500.

22. Photographer

To become a photographer, you need to be able to view the world slightly differently than the way others see it. That’s why it fits the introvert so well.

You also need to be sufficiently creative to shoot all sorts of events, ranging from commercials and weddings to art portraits. On average, a photographer can earn $20 per hour on a shoot.

Related: Guide for Selling Photos Online for Cash

23. IT Manager

The responsibility of an IT manager is to manage the operations and security of an organization or company’s information systems. IT managers can earn an annual salary of $87,797.

24. Mechanic

The role of a mechanic is to repair and maintain vehicles. There are specialized mechanic roles where you can work on certain vehicles and brands. On average, mechanics can earn upwards of $21 per hour.

25. Translator

A translator converts information or data from one language to another one. Translators work in a vast array of workplaces, from schools to courtrooms, and even work for private clients as freelancers. On average, a translator can earn up to $20.

26. Software Developer

Software developers are responsible for designing and building software programs. They also develop upgrades, test applications, and programs, as well as write documentation.

While the ability to work alongside others in a team and interpersonal skills are required for this role, there are various opportunities for thinking introverts to work in a heads-down role. 

A software engineer or developer can earn an average yearly salary of $105,590, with a positive job outlook said to grow 21% compared to other occupations over ten years.

27. Chef

The role of a chef can include managing the kitchen of a hotel or restaurant, as well as overseeing the general preparation of food, creating menus, maintaining food standards, and training staff. A chef can expect to earn an average yearly salary of $60,580.

28. Elevator Installer/Repairer

Elevator installers and repairers do just that; install and repair elevators, escalators, and other mechanical lifts. Typically they have a high school diploma at the very least and undergo an apprenticeship before obtaining a license in their state. 

This type of job is perfectly suited to those that are agile, physically strong, and handy. They also have to be able to deal with confined spaces and heights.

The median yearly salary for an elevator installer or repairer stands at $85,000, with recorded job growth of 10% over ten years.

29. B2B Sales

B2B sales simply mean selling products or services between businesses instead of directly to consumers – a situation introverts would prefer to avoid. Working in B2B sales can earn you an average salary of $47,990 a year.

Benefits of an Introverted Personality in the Workplace

There are many benefits introverted employees have to a company. Here are a few:

Introverts can be wonderful listeners

A great advantage of being introverted in a workplace is having the ability to simply listen. Introverts prefer to listen than speak.

An introverted person is typically also more comfortable thinking before they speak and being mindful of what they say. 

Being a great listener allows them to absorb more knowledge from leaders and colleagues. Learning and understanding what they are required to do can help introverts progress in their field. 

It is also this ability to listen that makes introverts perfectly suited for leadership roles. They can listen and properly analyze issues while paying attention to all sides of the divide when making decisions or solving problems.

Introverts are empathetic

One of the most undervalued traits in a workplace is empathy, and this is an area where introverted people shine.

It is important to note that empathy isn’t a trait exclusive to introverts. However, introverts express empathy very differently than extroverts. 

Because introverts are self-aware, they naturally consider those around them in a sensitive manner. This trait is evident as numerous introverts end up as therapists or counselors.

Having an innate ability to see the other person’s viewpoint is a valuable trait in the workplace, particularly when it has to do with problem-solving. This insight is also beneficial in various areas like marketing or product development, where the aim is to see another viewpoint outside your own.

An empathetic nature can help introverts excel in the workplace, especially if they are placed in leadership positions.

When leaders are empathetic, they create an inclusive work environment, making everyone feel like part of a team. This helps to boost loyalty, productivity, and morale among employees.

Introverts are inwardly focused 

Introverts are known to keep to themselves since socializing with others is physically and mentally draining. This means small talk doesn’t interest them.

Instead, they prefer conversations that foster real connections. As a result, these individuals are less concerned about workplace politics and drama. 

Free from those distractions, introverts can remain focused, turning their attention to their primary objectives.

Introverted people are typically drawn to workplaces that are quiet with fewer distractions. This allows them the space they require to work effectively.

Introverts are more cautious and thorough in their decision-making

When it comes down to decision-making, introverts take a thorough and cautious approach. They prefer to carefully consider various possible outcomes before making a decision. 

In addition, scientific studies have shown that introverts take longer to process information compared to extroverts. This means that they are more thoughtful, analytical, and insightful about their world. 

Introverts are known to be creative

Creativity is a trait that doesn’t necessarily require collaboration. Introverts prefer some quiet time alone for recharging and reflection.

The solitude enables them to develop their best ideas. Studies have shown that so long as introversion is not rooted in anxiety or fear, it can foster creative work and thinking.

Conclusion

There are a couple of things anxious introvert job seekers need to be aware of when searching for a job. The first thing is to find a job that doesn’t require too much social interaction with people.

Second, it is important to find jobs where the bulk of the work involves a small group or independent work.

Introverts or those with introverted tendencies should consider the number of new people they will have to interact with daily. Most introverts see social interaction with new people as a particularly tiring exercise. 

If the job requires you to interact with customers regularly, it might not be the job best suited to you. Preferably, you should pick a job that will surround you with the same set of people every day.

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Steffa Mantilla

Certified Financial Education Instructor

Steffa is a Certified Financial Education Instructor (CFEI) and the founder behind Money Tamer. Her 12-year background in operant conditioning and positive behavioral change training is used to help people find effective motivators to change their harmful money behaviors. Steffa explains the reasons “why” behind people’s financial behaviors and how to successfully change them. After paying off over $80,000 in debt through budgeting, she now teaches families how to get their own finances in order. You can learn more about her here.

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